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Social Science Courses

AAS/HIST 005: African Civilization (4 credits)
Sub-Saharan Africa through the millennia of the ancient world to the present. Human origins, state and non-state systems, the external slave trade; colonialism, resistance to European rule; independence movements; neocolonialism.

ANTH 011: Cultural Diversity and Human Nature (4 credits)
A cross-cultural investigation of variation in human societies. Examines forms of social organization, kinship, religion, symbolism, and language through the consideration of specific cultural case studies in local and global contexts. Students will learn how anthropological research methods enhance understanding of contemporary social issues, help solve real-world problems, and foster an informed perspective on what it means to be human.

ASIA/IR 061: East Asian IR (4 credits)
Introduction to East Asian international relations, with emphasis on post-1945 period: historical background of Asian international system; Cold War conflicts; China's rise and regional responses; Japan's changing international role; the two Koreas; ASEAN and Asian regionalism; U.S. and Russian policies; current and future issues.

ASIA/HIST/MLL 075: Chinese Civilization (4 credits)
The development of traditional Chinese thought, beliefs, technology, and institutions from a historical perspective.

CLSS/HIST 021: Greek History (4 credits)
The development of civilization from palaeolithic times to the world empire of Alexander the Great. The social, economic, religious, philosophic, artistic and literary development of the ancient world; the origin of political institutions.

COMM 001: Media and Society (4 credits)
This introduction to the roles of mass media in U.S. and global society explores a media-saturated society. Students learn how mass media operate in relationship to society, controversies surrounding their activities, social consequences of media behavior, and theories for examining mass media. Restricted to CAS students but other colleges and upperclassmen allowed by instructor’s permission.

ECO 001: Principles of Economics (4 credits)
A one-semester course in the principles of economics. General topics covered are: supply and demand; pricing and production decisions of firms; the role of government in the economy; the determination of national income; money and banking; monetary and fiscal policy; and government finance.

ECO 029: Money, Banking, and Financial Markets (3 credits)
The nature and functions of money. Global money and financial markets. The role of commercial and central banks. Effects of the interest rate, exchange rate, and the money supply on the economy. Examination and evaluation of current and past monetary policies.

Prequisite(s): ECO 001

ES 001: Introduction to Environmental Studies (4 credits)
Gateway to the field of Environmental Studies, the course surveys central issues and themes confronting humanity in the natural world on a national and global basis. Topics include humankind’s role in environmental change; society’s response to the dynamism of nature; cultural evaluations of nature; population dynamics; resource availability and pollution sinks; land use patterns; sustainability and consumerism; environmental justice and ethics; policy and planning. This course fulfills a social science credit requirement. Please select ES 002 to fulfill the natural science requirement.

GCP 010: Introduction to Global Citizenship (3 credits)
An interdisciplinary approach introduces the contested notion of global citizenship. Readings explore the meaning of citizenship in the global era; the viability of nationalism and cosmopolitanism; the efficacy of social change initiatives in transnational context; the impact of economic globalization on vulnerable populations; the role of the United Nations; the discourse of human rights; and the relation between global and local justice. Addressing topics of urgent concern, students' assignments consider global citizenship practice in relation to their area of study.

GS 001: Introduction To Global Studies (4 credits)
Globalization - the historical and continuing integration of peoples, cultures, markets and nations - is the defining characteristic of our century. It brings with it advantages and disadvantages, surfeit and suffering. In this interdisciplinary course, the foundation of the Global Studies major, students will be introduced to a variety of historical, critical and analytical perspectives, methods and vocabularies for continued study of globalization and social change. Priority given to CAS freshmen and sophomores.

GS/POLS 003: Comparative Politics (4 credits)
The political systems of foreign countries; approaches to the study of comparative politics.

GS/HIST/LAS 049: The True Road to El Dorado: Colonial Latin America (4 credits)
Examines the initial encounters of peoples of Iberian and African origins with the indigenous civilizations of the Western Hemisphere. Explores the development of a colonial economy and its global reach. Focuses on the birth of a distinctive Latin American society and culture, with attention to the Latin American patriots who fought for their freedom. No prior knowledge of Latin American history required.
Examines the initial encounters of peoples of Iberian and African origins with the indigenous civilizations of the Western Hemisphere. Explores the development of a colonial economy and its global reach. Focuses on the birth of a distinctive Latin America

HIST 001: Time Travel (4 credits)
Students discover the power of historical analysis in a rapidly changing world by investigating a series of pressing contemporary problems. History emerges as a vital tool for confronting human diversity and understanding how societies are transformed. Skills acquired include causal analysis, empathy, interpretation, source criticism, information management, digital methods, public engagement, and argumentative writing. Themes addressed vary with instructor.
This course uses non-fiction historical graphic novels as a basis for introducing the college-level study of history. Students will use the graphic accounts to explore basic questions about how historians construct narratives of past events using differen

AAS/HIST 005: African Civilization (4 credits)
SubSaharan Africa through the millennia of the ancient world to the present. Human origins, state and nonstate systems, the external slave trade, colonialism, resistance to European rule, independence movements, and neocolonialism.

HIST 007: Techn In America Industrl Age (4 credits)
Traces the development of American technology from the preindustrial colonial era until America's emergence as the world's leading industrial power. The interactions between technology and culture, society, politics, and the economy will also be addressed.

CLSS/HIST 021: Greek History (4 credits)
The development of civilization from paleolithic times to the world empire of Alexander the Great.The social, economic, religious, philosophic, artistic, and literary development of the ancient world; the origin of political institutions.

HIST 025: Pirates of the Caribbean (4 credits)
Introduction to the history of the Atlantic World, through the lens of piracy and seafaring. Interactions between Europe, Africa, and North and South America, 1442-1825.

GS/HIST/LAS 049: The True Road to El Dorado: Colonial Latin America (4 credits)
Examines the initial encounters of peoples of Iberian and African origins with the indigenous civilizations of the Western Hemisphere. Explores the development of a colonial economy and its global reach. Focuses on the birth of a distinctive Latin American society and culture, with attention to the Latin American patriots who fought for their freedom. No prior knowledge of Latin American history required.

ASIA/HIST/MLL 075: Understanding Hong Kong (4 credits)
The development of traditional Chinese thought, beliefs, technology, and institutions from a historical perspective.

HIST 095: Empire, War, and Resistance in the Middle East (4 credit)
During the past two hundred years, empires fought over the control of strategic trade routes and natural resources in the Middle East. The wars they waged redrew the boundaries in the region and sowed the seeds of the conflicts in Palestine, Iraq, and Syr

IR 002: Current Issues in World Affairs (3 credits)
This is a survey course designed primarily for non-IR majors or minors. The purpose is to acquaint students with some of the concepts and historical facts behind current global issues. The content of this course will, in part, be dictated by international events as they unfold.

IR 010: Introduction to World Politics (4 credits)
Introduction to the major principles, concepts, and theories of international relations, along with a historical background focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics to be covered include the nature of power, balance of power theories, national interest, decision-making in foreign policy, theories of war and expansion, patterns of Cooperation, and international political economy.

IR 040: The United Nations (4 credits)
Provides overview of key issues and debates in the United Nations and helps students understand the formal and informal operations of this global organization. We will explore two major questions. First, what are the major obstacles to effective international cooperation in the United Nations? Second, what does globalization mean for UN efforts to promote democracy, development, and human rights? Includes a trip to UN Headquarters in NY and an in-class UN simulation exercise.

ASIA/IR 061: East Asian IR (4 credits)
Introduction to East Asian international relations, with emphasis on post-1945 period: historical background of Asian international system; Cold War conflicts; China's rise and regional responses; Japan's changing international role; the two Koreas; ASEAN and Asian regionalism; U.S. and Russian policies; current and future issues.

IR 097: The U.S. National Security System (4 credit)
This is a course about the national security infrastructure of the U.S. What are the
different institutional structures, from the National Security Council, the State and
Defense Department, the CIA and other intelligence agencies and others. The course
w

JOUR 023: Editing (4 credits)
Students will strengthen news judgment, critical thinking and writing through careful editing of articles for accuracy, fairness and clarity, including use of proper spelling, grammar, usage and style. Practice in writing headlines for print and the Web, including search engine optimization and multimedia presentation of content.

Prequisite(s): JOUR 021 OR JOUR 123

JOUR 024: Visual Communication (4 credits)
Study of and practice in techniques of multimedia storytelling including photography, data visualization, print layout, and video-shooting and editing skills. This course combines principles of visual communication with hands-on work to help improve your visual literacy and multimedia skills and develop a professional digital portfolio. Prerequisite: Jour 21 or Jour 123.
Prequisite(s): JOUR 021 OR JOUR 123

GS/HIST/LAS 049: The True Road to El Dorado: Colonial Latin America (4 credits)
Examines the initial encounters of peoples of Iberian and African origins with the indigenous civilizations of the Western Hemisphere. Explores the development of a colonial economy and its global reach. Focuses on the birth of a distinctive Latin American society and culture, with attention to the Latin American patriots who fought for their freedom. No prior knowledge of Latin American history required.
Examines the initial encounters of peoples of Iberian and African origins with the indigenous civilizations of the Western Hemisphere. Explores the development of a colonial economy and its global reach. Focuses on the birth of a distinctive Latin America

ASIA/HIST/MLL 075: Chinese Civilization (4 credits)
The development of traditional Chinese thought, beliefs, technology, and institutions from a historical perspective.

POLS 001: American Political System (4 credits)
Constitutional principles; organization and operation of the national government; and dynamics of power within the U.S. political system.

GS/POLS 003: Comparative Politics (4 credits)
The political systems of foreign countries; approaches to the study of comparative politics.

PSYC 001: Introduction to Psychology (4 credits)
Psychology as a science of behavior. Natural science aspects such as learning, sensation-perception, and physiological bases; and social science aspects such as human development, intelligence, and personality. Methodologies appropriate to these areas, and related societal problems.

SDEV 010: Challenges of Sustainable Development (4 credits)
History and principles of sustainable development, including their application to projects in both rich and poor countries. Survey of current environmental, social and economic challenges to sustainable development. Philosophy and ethics of external intervention for poverty alleviation and green development, especially in poor societies. Integrated approaches to sustainable development practice, including the inter-relationship of the health sciences, natural sciences, social sciences and management.

SOC 001: Introduction to Sociology (4 credits)
Patterns of social interaction, group behavior and attitudes provide a focus on the relationship of the individual to society. Social structure and social change within the institutions of society provide a focus on the relationship of society to the individual. The influences of social class, gender and race are explored at each level of analyses. Theories, methods and research results provide micro and macro models for understanding society.

WGSS 001: Gender and Society (4 credits)
The course introduces students to key concepts, theoretical frameworks, and interdisciplinary research in the field of Women’s and Gender Studies. Examines how gender interacts with race, age, class, sexuality, etc., to shape human consciousness and determine the social organization of human society. The course may include topics such as: gender and work; sexuality and reproduction; women’s health; media constructions of gender and race; gender, law, and public policy.