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Humanities Courses

AAS/THTR 066: Hip Hop Dance (2 credits)

Techniques, vocabulary, and history behind the various elements of the Hip Hop Movement. Focus upon the cultural influence of Hip Hop dance styles, and the overall social influence of the Hip Hop Movement.

AAS/ENGL/LAS 096: American Childhood (4 credit)

This course takes a critical ethnic studies approach to the notion of growing up as an American child by decentering Anglo stories of childhood into a broader Hemispheric concept of American, including North, South, and Central America and U.S. colonies such as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In particular, we will read children's and young adult literature, and graphic novels which depict Latinx, African American, Indigenous, AfroLatinx children coming to consciousness in America. We will also look at how child protagonists negotiate themes of citizenship, race, class, and gender in an American context.

ARAB 001: Elementary Arabic I (4 credits)

The general objective of this course is to familiarize students with the sounds and the letters of Arabic, along with basic communication skills. Students are required to use Arabic in class discussion. Attendance and class participation are necessary to achieve the above-stated goals. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the elementary level.

ARAB 011: Intermediate Arabic I (4 credits)

Development of communication skills and cultural awareness through reading materials and viewing films. Grammar is presented in context. Emphasis on communicative ability in oral and writing skills, and on the use and cultural aspects of the language through authentic materials. Students learn how to communicate effectively and appropriately while satisfying their intellectual curiosity to learn about the civilization and culture, current as well as historical dimensions.

Prequisite(s): ARAB 002

ARCH 034: Digital Drawing and 3D Modeling (4 credits)

In our increasingly visual world we often need to present ideas in realistic, expressive, and engaging ways. This introductory course presents the basics of digital drawing and rendering through the lens of architecture, but is intended for students of all disciplines interested in visual communication. This project-based course focuses on the essentials of AutoCAD, SketchUp, and Revit supplemented with V-Ray and Photoshop for rendering.

ARCH 043: Architectural Design I (4 credits)

Fundamental design studio for architecture majors. Composition, spatial concepts; precedent; materials and detail; light and color in architecture. Instruction in basic communication techniques.

Prequisite(s): ART 004

ART 001: Art and Architecture History: Ancient to Medieval (4 credits)

Survey of art and architecture around the globe, from the world's earliest artistic and architectural production through the 14th century. European, Middle Eastern, African, Asian and Central and South American works are covered. The course also serves as an introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, and methods of art and architectural history.

ART 003: Two-Dimensional Design (4 credits)

This class will present the foundations necessary to understand, discuss and create in the two-dimensional visual world. Using variety of materials and techniques and digital media, students will explore the concepts of line, form, shape, value, texture, space and color. Required for all Architecture, Art, Art History and Design majors.

ART 004: Three-Dimensional Design (4 credits)

An introduction to the basic elements and principles of design. involves use of various materials to solve 3D design problems in studio and computer lab. Problem solving in variety of materials for 3D design including assemblages, models, constructions, and conceptual forms. Required for all majors in department.

ART 011: Drawing I (4 credits)

Concepts and practice of drawing, both traditional and contemporary. Includes drawing from life and an introduction to materials and techniques.

ART/ART 013: Sculpture I (4 credits)

Projects directed toward developing design in sculpture. Exploration of materials and their application. Emphasis on sculptural form as it relates to techniques.

ART/ART 035: Painting I (4 credits)

Painting in oil beginning with color mixing and basic layering techniques. Students learn the basic mechanisms for creative expression. Emphasis on understanding the physical nature of the materials. Studio

Prequisite(s): ART 003 OR ART 004 OR ART 011

ART 073: Introductory Studio Practice (1-4 credit)

An introduction to the methods and techniques of studio art. Designed to acquaint the student with general studio practice, covering topics not covered in other specific studio course listings.

ASIA/THTR 055: Indian Classical Dance (2 credits)

Introduction to the history and practice of Bharatanatyam, a classical dance style of India. Understanding basic footwork, hand gestures, and body movements, and how they are combined to convey emotion, meaning, and imagery. Traditional repertoire, music, terminology, and the spectator's experience of the dance.

Course fee of $270. Class will be held in Zollner Arts Center room 121

ASIA/FILM/HIST/MLL 096: Understanding Hong Kong (4 credits)

This course introduces Hong Kong, from it's history as a vibrant British colony to its current status as a bustling territory mediating between China and the world. The learning objectives and outcomes consist not only of a knowledge of Hong Kong's significance for global commerce and culture but also of the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources as well as to conduct independent research. Course materials, which include wartime stories and autobiographical novellas, romantic comedies and martial arts films, are all available in English.

ASIA/GS/REL 096: Muslim Asia in the 21st Century: Religion, Culture Politics (4 credits)

Despite the overwhelming focus on Islam in the Middle East, most Muslims in the world now live in South and Southeast Asia. In this course, we will explore the ongoing evolution of these societies as they deal with the novel opportunities and challenges of globalization in the 21st century. We will also investigate how modern Muslim identities emerge from a complex interplay between religion, culture, and politics.

CHIN 001: Beginning Chinese Reading and Writing I (2 credits)

Introduction to the Chinese writing system and beginning character acquisition; reading practice with pinyin transcription system. (Fall) Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.

CHIN 003: Beginning Spoken Chinese I (2 credits)

Introduction to Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, the pinyin transcription system, and modern colloquial Chinese; emphasis on oral proficiency. Not open to native speakers. Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing course of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken course.

CHIN 011: Intermediate Chinese Reading and Writing I (2 credits)

Continued focus on vocabulary/character acquisition and text-based reading and writing exercises using Chinese characters. Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken course of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.

CHIN 013: Intermediate Spoken Chinese I (2 credits)

Further development of communicative skills in Chinese using situational dialogues and class discussion; emphasis on oral proficiency. Not open to native speakers. Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing course of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken course.

CLSS/ENGL 050: Classical Mythology (4 credits)

Introduction to the study of the Greco-Roman myths in their social, political, and historical contexts. Emphasis on myths and their analysis as important evidence for studying classical antiquity.

DES 040: Product Design I: Form, Process and Concept (4 credits)

Introduction to the field of Industrial Design. Through research, analysis, drawing and prototyping, students will acquire an understanding of the various aesthetic, technological, and business issues a designer must consider when creating a product. Consent of department required.

Prequisite(s): (ART 003 OR ART 011) AND ART 004

DES 053: Introduction to Graphic Design (4 credits)

This course serves as an introduction to the graphic design process, with a primary focus on concept development and craft. Students examine how to identify and resolve visual problems and learn the basics of design and typography. Creative solutions will be encouraged for projects with practical applications. Topics include logo development and execution, professional typography, image basics and resolution, print production, studio skills and professional practices. Digital applications include Photoshop, Illustrator and In-design.

Prequisite(s): ART 003

DES 070: Web Design I (4 credits)

Introduction to the design and fabrication of web pages. Students will learn how to create pages using HTML and web fabrication software, with an emphasis on aesthetic and structure.

Prequisite(s): ART 003

DES/THTR 088: Digital Rendering (4 credits)

Explore the use of modern technology to develop and communicate design ideas with speed, clarity, and visual punch. Strategies geared toward increasing the young designer’s confidence in presenting artistic concepts. Learn the basics of Photoshop and SketchUp and then apply those skills in creative execution of scenic, costume, and lighting renderings.

CLSS/ENGL 050: Classical Mythology (4 credits)

Introduction to the study of the Greco-Roman myths in their social, political, and historical contexts. Equal emphasis on learning the myths and strategies for interpreting them as important evidence for studying classical antiquity

ENGL/THTR 060: Dramatic Action (4 credits)

How plays are put together; how they work and what they accomplish. Examination of how plot, character, aural and visual elements of production combine to form a unified work across genre, styles and periods. Recommended as a foundation for further studies in design, literature, or performance.

AAS/ENGL/LAS 096: American Childhood (4 credits)

This course takes a critical ethnic studies approach to the notion of growing up as an American child by decentering Anglo stories of childhood into a broader Hemispheric concept of American, including North, South, and Central America and U.S. colonies such as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In particular, we will read children's and young adult literature, and graphic novels which depict Latinx, African American, Indigenous, AfroLatinx children coming to consciousness in America. We will also look at how child protagonists negotiate themes of citizenship, race, class, and gender in an American context.

ENGL 098: Literature and Social Justice (4 credit)

How do literary writers account for poverty in a land of extreme colonial wealth? How do they espouse the national ideal of freedom in an empire dedicated to slavery? How do they promote social equality in a nation where women are openly considered inferior to men? This course will confront these types of questions as we examine the strategies by which social justice causes such as poverty, prejudice, slavery, and feminism are established and promoted in representative texts from British and American fiction, poetry, music, art and philosophy. We will also use this course as an opportunity to investigate whether literature is an under-utilized space for thinking about the geneses of other contemporary causes associated with social justice. For instance, does the contemporary discourse about gay marriage owe its genesis to a series of lesbian marriages promoted in eighteenth-century fiction and newspapers?

ETH/PHIL 006: Conduct and Character (4 credits)

How should we live our lives? How should we act? What kinds of persons should we be? What should we care about? These are among the central questions of philosophy because they are among the most central questions of human existence. This explores answers that have been proposed by thinkers throughout history and across cultures. Course not open to seniors.

FILM 001: Introduction to Film (4 credits)

Introduction to historical, technical, aesthetic, and cultural elements of film. We will consider issues of filmic production and film history and devote specific attention to different filmic techniques and critical approaches to mise-en- scène, cinematography, editing, and film sound. Students should develop a critical vocabulary for talking about film and various critical tools/strategies for analyzing film. Our primary goal is to enhance our enjoyment of film by learning to think about the filmic industry and its aesthetic productions more critically.

ASIA/FILM/HIST/MLL 096: Understanding Hong Kong (4 credit)

This course introduces Hong Kong, from its history as a vibrant British colony to its current status as a bustling territory mediating between China and the world. The learning objectives and outcomes consist not only of a knowledge of Hong Kong's significance for global commerce and culture but also of the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources as well as to conduct independent research. Course materials, which include wartime stories and autobiographical novellas, romantic comedies and martial arts films, are all available in English.

FREN 001: Elementary French I (4 credits)

Multimedia approach to the study of French. Introduction to French conversation, grammar, and culture.

FREN 011: Intermediate French I (4 credits)

Further acquisition of the fundamentals of French conversation, writing, and culture. Multimedia approach.

GERM 001: Elementary German I (4 credits)

Fundamentals of German; reading and simple texts; simple conversation and composition; vocabulary building.Three class hours plus one laboratory or drill hour each week. No previous German required.

GERM 011: Intermediate German I (4 credits)

Review of grammar, composition, reading of intermediate texts, vocabulary building.

GRK 091: Independent Study (1-4 credit)

GS/REL 011: Introduction to World Religions (4 credits)

Living and working in a globalizing 21st century requires an understanding of diverse religious and cultural identities. In this course, students will be introduced to the history, ideas, and practices from a wide variety of the world's religious traditions.

GS/REL 062: Explorations in Dialogue (4 credits)

Course critically investigates inter-religious dialogue, an important issue in the contemporary academic study of religion. Focus will be on the problem of inter-religious encounter; religion and globalization; different models of dialogue; and the questions of power and identity. At least two traditions will be put into conversation for any proposed offering (e.g., Christian-Buddhist, Jewish-Muslim, Jewish-Christian).

ASIA/GS/REL 096: Muslim Asia in the 21st Century: Religion, Culture, Politics (4 credit)

Despite an overwhelming focus on Islam in the Middle East, most Muslims in the world now live in South and Southeast Asia. In this course, we will explore the ongoing evolution of these societies as they deal with the novel opportunities and challenges of globalization in the 21st century. We will also investigate how modern Muslim identities emerge from a complex interplay between religion, culture, and politics.

HEBR 001: Elementary Modern Hebrew I (4 credits)

Class instruction will focus on the introduction of the Hebrew alphabet and basic vocabulary. Instruction will also emphasize the basics of Hebrew listening comprehension, vocabulary, reading, writing, grammar and speaking. Class activities are planned for an inclusive approach to different styles of learning. No previous study of Hebrew required.

HIST 015: English Revolutions (4 credits)

The Protestant Reformation, the Civil Wars, and the Glorious Revolution, from Henry the Eighth to John Locke. Examines how three bloody conflicts gave birth to the first modern society. Explores the origins of empire, capitalism, secularization, nationalism, and democracy.

ASIA/FILM/HIST/MLL 096: Understanding Hong Kong (4 credits)

This course introduces Hong Kong, from its history as a vibrant British colony to its current status as a bustling territory mediating between China and the world. The learning objectives and outcomes consist not only of a knowledge of Hong Kong's significance for global commerce and culture but also of the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources as well as to conduct independent research. Course materials, which include wartime stories and autobiographical novellas, romantic comedies and martial arts films, are all available in English.

JPNS 001: Elementary Japanese I (4 credits)

This course introduces the basic grammatical structures commonly found in daily situations in Japan. All four aspects of language skills are introduced. Hirangana, Katakana, and approximately 50 Kanji are introduced.

JPNS 011: Intermediate Japanese I (4 credits)

Continuation of JPNS 002. This course introduces more complex grammatical structures and develops all four aspects of language skills. Slightly more emphasis on reading and writing. Approximately 100 Kanji are introduced.

Prequisite(s): JPNS 002

JPNS 097: Survival Japanese (2 credit)

This course aims to expose students to real-life Japanese communication. It is appropriate for students who want to learn how to communicate in practical situations such as travel and shopping. It is not designed to increase one's knowledge of grammar, sentence patterns, and reading/writing proficiency. The hiragana and katakana syllabaries are introduce.

AAS/ENGL/LAS 096: American Childhood (4 credit)

This course takes a critical ethnic studies approach to the notion of growing up as an American child by decentering Anglo stories of childhood into a broader Hemispheric concept of American, including North, South, and Central America and U.S. colonies such as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In particular, we will read children's and young adult literature, and graphic novels which depict Latinx, African American, Indigenous, AfroLatinx children coming to consciousness in America. We will also look at how child protagonists negotiate themes of citizenship, race, class, and gender in an American context.

LAT 001: Elementary Latin I (4 credits)

Fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Emphasis on language structure and vocabulary building.

ASIA/FILM/HIST/MLL 096: Understanding Hong Kong (4 credit)

This course introduces Hong Kong, from its history as a vibrant British colony to its current status as a bustling territory mediating between China and the world. The learning objectives and outcomes consist not only of a knowledge of Hong Kong's significance for global commerce and culture but also of the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources as well as to conduct independent research. Course materials, which include wartime stories and autobiographical novellas, romantic comedies and marital arts films, are all available in English.

MUS 005: Keyboard Skills (0-1 credits)

For intended music minors and majors only. Piano competence including scales, prepared pieces, sight reading and other skills. Leading to the Piano Proficiency exam requirement for all majors. Course may be repeated until Piano Proficiency exam passed.

For intended majors only. Piano competence including scales, prepared pieces, sight reading and other skills. Leading to the Piano Proficiency exam requirement for all majors. Course may be repeated until Piano Proficiency is passed.

MUS 007: Aural Skills (0-1 credits)

Intended for both music majors and minors only, this course focuses on singing, playing, and writing melodies/rhythms/harmonies in different tonalities and scales. It also explores chromaticism, mixed meters, singing and playing two-part music simultaneously, and singing together in parts. Leads to Aural Proficiency exam for all majors.

MUS 010: Basic Skills in Music (3 credits)

Music can express that which cannot be said in words. This is part of the reason that it has been cherished in every culture in the history of humanity. By learning and applying active listening skills through a survey of Western Art Music, students develop an ability to think critically about music and to write intelligently about a wide range of musical experience. Intended for those not planning to major or minor in music.

Music can express that which cannot be said in words. This is part of the reason that it has been cherished in every culture in the history of humanity. By learning and applying active listening skills through a survey of Western Art Music, students develop an ability to think critically about music and to write intelligently about a wide range of musical experience. Intended for those not planning to major or minor in music.

MUS 021: Marching Band (0-1 credits)

No audition required for admission.

MUS 022: Wind Ensemble (0-1 credits)

Admission by audition.

MUS 024: Jazz Ensemble (0-1 credits)

Up to six credits may be used for graduation credit in CEAS and CBE. Admission by audition.

MUS 027: Jazz Orchestra (0-1 credits)

Student/community/professional musicians performing classic, contemporary and original big band literature.

MUS 031: University Choir (0-1 credits)

Admission by audition.

MUS 032: Choral Union (0-1 credits)

No audition required for admission.

MUS 033: Glee Club (0-1 credits)

Admission by audition.

MUS 034: Freshman Lab Choir (0 credits)

Admission by audition.

MUS 035: Dolce Women's Choir (0-1 credits)

Women from university choir sing treble music.

MUS 048: Chamber Music Collegium (0-1 credits)

Admission by audition.

MUS 049: Small Jazz Ensembles (0-1 credits)

Admission by audition.

MUS 061: Philharmonic Orchestra (0-1 credits)

Admission by audition.

MUS 065: Class Guitar for Beginners (0-1 credits)

Beginning techniques and skills for guitar, either acoustic or electric. For students with less than a year of guitar instruction. Students supply their own instruments. Fees associated with course.

MUS 067: Class Drum Set for Beginners (0-1 credits)

Rudiments of drum set playing for students with less than a year of drum instruction. Fees associated with course.

MUS 068: Beginner Class Piano I (0-1 credits)

Instruction for beginning piano students, including rudiments of musical notation in relation to the keyboard; beginning pieces for solo piano and the group. Fees associated with course.

MUS 068: Class Piano for Beginners I (0-1 credits)

Instruction for beginning piano students, including rudiments of musical notation in relation to the keyboard; beginning pieces for solo piano and the group. Fees associated with course.

MUS 071: Private Piano Study (0-1 credits)

Up to six credits may be used for graduation credit in CEAS and CBE. Fees associated with course.

MUS 072: Private Vocal Study (0-1 credits)

Private instruction. Fees associated with course.

MUS 073: Private String Study (0-1 credits)

Private instruction. Fees associated with course.

MUS 074: Private Woodwind Study (0-1 credits)

Private instruction. Fees associated with course.

MUS 075: Private Brass Study (0-1 credits)

Private instruction. Fees associated with course.

MUS 076: Private Percussion Study (0-1 credits)

Private instruction. Fees associated with course.

MUS 077: Private Organ Study (0-1 credits)

Private instruction. Fees associated with course.

MUS 078: Private Acoustic Guitar

Private Acoustic Guitar (0-1 credits)

Private instruction. Fees associated with course.

MUS 079: Private Electric Guitar Study (0-1 credits)

Private instruction. Fees associated with course.

MUS 081: Foundations of Western Music (4 credits)

Introduction to the elements of Western music: pitch and rhythm recognition, intervals, scales, keys, diatonic harmonies, etc. Overview of Western music’s history and forms. Analysis of a masterpiece from various points of view. Getting into the habit of attending, reporting on, and enjoying live concerts. Students should be able to read music.

MUS 084: Private Drumset Study (0-1 credits)

Private Instruction. Fees associated with the course.

PHIL 004: Belief, Knowledge, and Action: An Introduction to Philosophy (4 credits)

Through reading selected texts in philosophy, from the ancient period to the modern Enlightenment and Romantic reaction, we shall introduce ourselves to some of the central epistemological, ontological, ethical, and socio-political positions developed in relation to their historical and material contexts. A unifying theme thus will be the emergence and evolution of rational thought and its relation to belief, knowledge, and action. Course not open to seniors.

ETH/PHIL 006: Conduct and Character: An Introduction to Philosophy (4 credits)

How should we live our lives? How should we act? What kinds of persons should we be? What should we care about? These are among the central questions of philosophy because they are among the most central questions of human existence. This explores answers that have been proposed by thinkers throughout history and across cultures. Course not open to seniors.

PHIL 023: Artists on Art and Life (4 credits)

One of the peculiarities of the philosophical study of art, Aesthetics, is that philosophers ignore the writings of artists on art. This introduction to philosophy does not. Aestheticians spend much of their time writing about what art is. Artists are more interested in what art does and how art does it, and those questions, and artists and their works, will be the focus of this course. Course not open to seniors.

PHIL/REL 095: Is God Dead? Past, Present, Future (4 credit)

Is God dead? Some people think so. Do you? Come decide for yourself. This course looks at the idea of god in Western philosophy and theology, with particular attention to death of god movement(s), and the changing shape of these movements in light of culture wars and identity politics. The course surveys key thinkers to ask questions about the origins, function, and future of god and gods in the contemporary world. Posed as an ongoing question-Is god dead?-the course is for anyone interested in the idea of god past, present, future.

REL 005: Spiritual Exercises in Religious Traditions (4 credits)

Explores a variety of religious disciplines developed in various traditions, ranging from the practice of yoga and the martial arts to various forms of prayer, meditation, and asceticism.

GS/REL 011: Introduction to World Religions (4 credits)

Living and working in a globalizing 21st century requires an understanding of diverse religious and cultural identities. In this course, students will be introduced to the history, ideas, and practices from a wide variety of the world's religious traditions.

GS/REL 062: Explorations in Dialogue (4 credits)

Course critically investigates inter-religious dialogue, an important issue in the contemporary academic study of religion. Focus will be on the problem of inter-religious encounter; religion and globalization; different models of dialogue; and the questions of power and identity. At least two traditions will be put into conversation for any proposed offering (e.g., Christian-Buddhist, Jewish-Muslim, Jewish-Christian).

REL 075: The Christian Tradition (4 credits)

Introduction to the Christian tradition from its early variety and subsequent classical definition in the church councils up to the enlightenment. Special emphasis will be placed on the multiform interpretations of the Christian message.

PHIL/REL 095: Is God Dead? Past, Present, Future (4 credits)

Is God Dead? Some people think so. Do you? Come decide for yourself. This course looks at the idea of god in Western philosophy and theology, with particular attention to death of god movement(s), and the changing shape of these movements in light of culture wars and identity politics. The course surveys key thinkers to ask questions about the origins, functions, and future of god and gods in the contemporary world. Posed as an ongoing question-Is god dead?-the course is for anyone interested in the idea of god past, present, future.

ASIA/GS/REL 096: Muslim Asia in the 21st Century: Religion, Culture, Politics (4 credit)

Despite an overwhelming focus on Islam in the Middle East, most Muslims in the world now live in South and Southeast Asia. In this course, we will explore the ongoing evolution of these societies as they deal with the novel opportunities and challenges of globalization in the 21st century. We will also investigate how modern Muslim identities emerge from a complex interplay between religion, culture, and politics.

RUSS 001: Elementary Russian I (4 credits)

Classroom and laboratory, audio, and video introduction to the fundamentals of conversational and grammatical patterns; practice in pronunciation, simple conversation, reading, and writing.

RUSS 011: Intermediate Russian I (4 credits)

Classroom and laboratory practice in conversation. Development of reading and writing skills.

SPAN 001: Elementary Spanish I (4 credits)

Basic conversational Spanish illustrating essential grammatical principles. Reading of simple texts and writing.

SPAN 011: Intermediate Spanish I (4 credits)

Limited review of elementary grammar concepts and introduction to more advanced grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on discussion, reading, and writing about short literary works and current topics in the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 012: Intermediate Spanish II (4 credits)

Continuation of SPAN 011.

THTR 011: Introduction To Acting (4 credits)

Preparation for scene study and characterization.

THTR 020: Stagecraft I (2 credits)

Introduction to the art of scenic construction and technical theatre. Scenic construction materials, techniques, tools, rigging and safety. Practical experience in executing scenery for the stage.

THTR 022: Stage Properties and Decoration (2 credits)

Creating props and decor for the stage. Production assignment as assistant property master.

THTR 023: Basic Scene Painting (2 credits)

Painting for the stage. Production assignments painting with scenic artist.

THTR 025: Costume Construction I (2 credits)

Introduction to the art of costume construction. Costume construction materials, techniques, tools and safety. Practical experience in executing costumes for the stage.

THTR 026: Costume Construction II (2 credits)

Continuation of THTR 25 - Costume Construction I, including pattern drafting, fitting, crafts and accessories. Materials, methods and problem solving. Practical experience in executing costumes for the stage.

Prequisite(s): THTR 025

THTR 027: Lighting Technology and Production I (2 credits)

Introduction to the art of lighting technology and production. Lighting techniques, tools and safety. Practical experience in executing lighting for the stage.

THTR 028: Lighting Technology and Production II (2 credits)

Specialty equipment, methods and problem solving. Practical experience in programming the lighting console for production. Assignment as light board operator on a production.

THTR 030: Sound Technology and Production I (2 credits)

Introduction to the theory, equipment and practice of sound reinforcement for the theatre, including microphone theory, speaker use and placement, digital audio networks, and live mixing.

THTR 031: Sound Technology and Production II (2 credits)

Advanced Sound Reinforcement techniques including multiple source mixing, specialty equipment and audio system design and installation.

Prequisite(s): THTR 030

THTR 035: Performance: THTR 245-12 (AR) (2 credits)

Performing in a department-approved production.

THTR 035: Performance: THTR 245-13 (PKP) (2 credits)

Performing in a department-approved production.

THTR 035: Performance: THE BROKEN MACHINE (2 credits)

Performing in a department-approved production.

THTR 035: Performance: SMART PEOPLE (2 credits)

Performing in a department-approved production.

THTR 045: Stage Management (2 credits)

Organization, scheduling, coordination of various production specialties. Production assignment as assistant stage manager.

First class meeting: Wed, 8/30/16 from 4-5:30 pm. Room TBA. (Actual class schedule TBD at this first meeting)

ASIA/THTR 055: Indian Classical Dance (2 credits)

Introduction to the history and practice of Bharatanatyam, a classical dance style of India. Understanding basic footwork, hand gestures, and body movements, and how they are combined to convey emotion, meaning, and imagery. Traditional repertoire, music, terminology, and the spectator's experience of the dance.

Course fee of $270. Classes will be held in Zoellner Arts Center room 121

THTR 056: Jazz Dance (2 credits)

Jazz dance styles and combinations. Fee required.

ENGL/THTR 060: Dramatic Action (4 credits)

How plays are put together; how they work and what they accomplish. Examination of how plot, character, aural and visual elements of production combine to form a unified work across genre, styles and periods. Recommended as a foundation for further studies in design, literature, or performance.

How plays are put together; how they work and what they accomplish. Examination of how plot, character, aural and visual elements of production combine to form a unified work across genre, styles and periods. Recommended as a foundation for further studies in design, literature, or performance.

AAS/THTR 066: Hip Hop Dance (2 credits)

Techniques, vocabulary, and history behind the various elements of the Hip Hop Movement. Focus upon the cultural influence of Hip Hop dance styles, and the overall social influence of the Hip Hop Movement.

THTR 067: Backstage Crew (2 credits)

Production run crew assignment.

DES/THTR 088: Digital Rendering (4 credits)

Explore the use of modern technology to develop and communicate design ideas with speed, clarity, and visual punch. Strategies geared toward increasing the young designer’s confidence in presenting artistic concepts. Learn the basics of Photoshop and SketchUp and then apply those skills in creative execution of scenic, costume, and lighting renderings.