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Humanities Courses

AAS/THTR 059: West African Dance (2 credits)
This course will explore the dance movement and rhythms of West Africa. Students will learn African-based dance technique, characteristics, and the fundamental connection between the drums and the dance. Although some videos will be viewed, this is primarily a studio course; students should come prepared to move.

AAS/THTR 066: Hip Hop Dance (2 credits)
Techniques, vocabulary, and history behind the various elements of the Hip Hop Movement. Focus upon the cultural influence of Hip Hop dance styles, and the overall social influence of the Hip Hop Movement.

AAS/THTR 066: Hip Hop Dance (2 credits)
Techniques, vocabulary, and history behind the various elements of the Hip Hop Movement. Focus upon the cultural influence of Hip Hop dance styles, and the overall social influence of the Hip Hop Movement.

ARAB 001: Elementary Arabic I (4 credits)
The general objective of this course is to familiarize students with the sounds and the letters of Arabic, along with basic communication skills. Students are required to use Arabic in class discussion. Attendance and class participation are necessary to achieve the above-stated goals. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to read, write, speak, and understand Arabic at the elementary level.

ART 001: Art and Architecture History 1 (4 credits)
Survey of art and architecture around the globe, from the world's earliest artistic and architectural production through the 14th century. European, Middle Eastern, African, Asian and Central and South American works are covered. The course also serves as an introduction to the vocabulary, concepts, and methods of art and architectural history.

ART 003: Two-Dimensional Design (4 credits)
This class will present the foundations necessary to understand, discuss and create in the two-dimensional visual world. Using variety of materials and techniques and digital media, students will explore the concepts of line, form, shape, value, texture, space and color. Required for all Architecture, Art, Art History and Design majors.

ART 004: Three-Dimensional Design (4 credits)
An introduction to the basic elements and principles of design. involves use of various materials to solve 3D design problems in studio and computer lab. Problem solving in variety of materials for 3D design including assemblages, models, constructions, and conceptual forms. Required for all majors in department.

ART 007: Digital Photography I (4 credits)
Intensive work in photography as fine art using digital input and output.  Lectures, demonstratons, critiques.

ART 011: Drawing I (4 credits)
Concepts and practice of drawing, both traditional and contemporary. Includes drawing from life and an introduction to materials and techniques.

ART/ART 013: Sculpture I (4 credits)
Projects directed toward developing design in sculpture. Exploration of materials and their application. Emphasis on sculptural form as it relates to techniques.

ART 069: Special Topics In Art History (1 credit)
Directed projects for students in the history of art or architecture.  Consent of instructor required.

ART 073: Introductory Studio Practice (1 credit)
An introduction to the methods and techniques of studio art. Designed to acquaint the student with general studio practice, covering topics not covered in other specific studio course listings.

ASIA/GS/REL 095: Muslim Asia: Rel, Culture, Pol (4 credit)
Despite an overwhelming focus on Islam in the Middle East, most Muslims in the World now live in South and Southeast Asia.  In this course, we will explore the ongoing evolution of these societies as the deal with the novel  opportunities and challenges of globalization in the 21st century.  We will also investigate how modern Muslim identities emerge from a complex interplay between religion, culture, and politics.

ASIA/HIST/MLL 096: Understanding Hong Kong (4 credits)
This course introduces Hong Kong, from its history as a vibrant British colony to its current status as a bustling territory mediating between China and the world. The learning objectives and outcomes consist not only of a knowledge of Hong Kong's significance for global commerce and culture but also of the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources as well as to conduct independent research. Course materials, which include wartime stories and autobiographical novellas, romantic comedies and martial arts films, are all available in English.

CHIN 001: Begin Chin Reading & Writing I (2 credits)
Introduction to the Chinese writing system and beginning character acquisition; reading practice with pinyin transcription system. (Fall) Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken  of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.

CHIN 001: Begin Chinese Read & Writing I (2 credits)
Introduction to the Chinese writing system and beginning character acquisition; reading practice with pinyin transcription system. (Fall) Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken  of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.

CHIN 003: Beginning Spoken Chinese I (2 credits)
Introduction to Mandarin Chinese pronunciation, the pinyin transcription system, and modern colloquial Chinese; emphasis on oral proficiency. Not open to native speakers. Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing course of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken course.

CHIN 011: Intermed Chin Read & Writing I (2 credits)
Continued focus on vocabulary/character acquisition and text-based reading and writing exercises using Chinese characters.  Non-heritage speakers are strongly encouraged to take the Spoken course of the same level during the same semester as this Reading and Writing course.

CHIN 013: Intermediate Spoken Chinese I (2 credits)
Further development of communicative skills in Chinese using situational dialogues and class discussion; emphasis on oral proficiency. Not open to native speakers.  Students are strongly encouraged to take Reading and Writing course of the same level during the same semester as this Spoken course.

CLSS/ENGL/THTR 054: Greek Tragedy (4 credits)
Aspects of Greek theater and plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in their social and intellectual contexts.

DES/THTR 087: Performance Design (4 credits)
Introduction to the process of creating integrated designs in theatre production. The study and practice of the principles of visual representation, historical and conceptual research and the study of theatrical styles.

CLSS/ENGL/THTR 054: Greek Tragedy (4 credits)
Aspects of Greek theater and plays of Aechylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in their social and intellectual contexts.

ENGL/THTR 060: Dramatic Action (4 credits)
How plays are put together; how they work and what they accomplish. Examination of how plot, character, aural and visual elements of production combine to form a unified work across genre, styles and periods. Recommended as a foundation for further studies in design, literature, or performance.

ENGL 096: Poetry Matters (4 credits)
This course will teach you why poetry matters in the 21st century—why it matters today, perhaps more than ever in a 24-hour virtual world of emoticons, internet memes, and streaming videos. As we explore questions about poetry's place in the world, students will learn about several influential traditions in modern American poetry. In addition to meeting in the classroom, students will attend poetry events on campus and will also be encouraged to craft their own original poetry.

ENGL/WGSS 097: Rewriting Romance (4 credit)
This course will pair classic literary romances with contemporary romantic comedies to examine the tropes that transcend form and time. These pairings will allow the class to investigate the ways in which cultural beliefs about gender, class, race, religion, age, and sexuality inflect our perceptions of romance. Romantic comedies as a genre either reinforce exclusionary notions of “normal” romance, or offer plots constructed around specific challenges to love based in cultural difference; together, we will look at the roots of this trend in literature through the lens of a few enduring themes.  Cross-listed with WGSS 97.

ENGL/LAS 098: Intro Latinx Lit & Culture (4 credit)
This course provides an overview of the literary history and criticism of Latinx literature and media. Through a combination of critical and literary theory, we will focus on Latinx-centered texts including poetry, prose, film, and television which portray issues of migration/immigration, colonialism, history, race, and gender. We will also examine the role of literature in the development of Latinx Studies. Authors and scholars featured in the course include José Martí, Pura Belpré, Pedro Pietri, the Young Lords Party, Julia Alvarez, and Gloria Anzaldua. Some questions that will inform our readings of these texts: 1) How do Latinx writers incorporate and revise U.S. and Latin American literary traditions? 2) How does the organization of Latin@ literature present challenges to U.S. canon formation?

The course readings will consist of a combination of popular articles, speeches, poetry, fiction, and scholarly works. The readings are meant to guide students through a foundation of theory and research into areas of practice, and also raise issues regarding the “canon” and the “counter-canon.” Assignments include a short written analysis of a text (5 pages) and a longer, research project (8-10 pages) which can take the form of a research paper, teaching plan, or multimedia video. Student will also keep a service-learning journal from our interactions with local community organizations.The interactive format (lecture, small group discussion, in-class writing) of this course will also require students active participation. 

FREN 001: Elementary French I (4 credits)
Multimedia approach to the study of French. Introduction to French conversation, grammar, and culture.

FREN 011: Intermediate French I (4 credits)
Further acquisition of the fundamentals of French conversation, writing, and culture. Multimedia approach.

GERM 001: Elementary German I (4 credits)
Fundamentals of German; reading and simple texts; simple conversation and composition; vocabulary building.Three class hours plus one laboratory or drill hour each week. No previous German required.

GERM 011: Intermediate German I (4 credits)
Review of grammar, composition, reading of intermediate texts, vocabulary building.

ASIA/GS/REL 095: Muslim Asia: Rel Culture, Pol (4 credit)
Despite an overwhelming focus on Islam in the Middle East, most Muslims in the World now live in South and Southeast Asia.  In this course, we will explore the ongoing evolution of these societies as the deal with the novel  opportunities and challenges of globalization in the 21st century.  We will also investigate how modern Muslim identities emerge from a complex interplay between religion, culture, and politics.

HEBR 001: Elementary Modern Hebrew I (4 credits)
Class instruction will focus on the introduction of the Hebrew alphabet and basic vocabulary. Instruction will also emphasize the basics of Hebrew listening comprehension, vocabulary, reading, writing, grammar and speaking. Class activities are planned for an inclusive approach to different styles of learning. No previous study of Hebrew required.

HEBR 011: Interm Modern Hebrew I (4 credits)
Class instruction will focus on developing fundamental patterns of conversation and expanding grammar. Hebrew 1 and Hebrew 2, or previous background in Hebrew required.

ASIA/HIST/MLL 096: Understanding Hong Kong (4 credits)
This course introduces Hong Kong, from its history as a vibrant British colony to its current status as a bustling territory mediating between China and the world. The learning objectives and outcomes consist not only of a knowledge of Hong Kong's significance for global commerce and culture but also of the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources as well as to conduct independent research. Course materials, which include wartime stories and autobiographical novellas, romantic comedies and martial arts films, are all available in English.

JPNS 001: Elementary Japanese I (4 credits)
This course introduces the basic grammatical structures commonly found in daily situations in Japan. All four aspects of language skills are introduced. Hirangana, Katakana, and approximately 50 Kanji are introduced.

ENGL/LAS 098: Intro  Latinx Lit and Culture (4 credit)
This course provides an overview of the literary history and criticism of Latinx literature and media. Through a combination of critical and literary theory, we will focus on Latinx-centered texts including poetry, prose, film, and television which portray issues of migration/immigration, colonialism, history, race, and gender. We will also examine the role of literature in the development of Latinx Studies. Authors and scholars featured in the course include José Martí, Pura Belpré, Pedro Pietri, the Young Lords Party, Julia Alvarez, and Gloria Anzaldua. Some questions that will inform our readings of these texts: 1) How do Latinx writers incorporate and revise U.S. and Latin American literary traditions? 2) How does the organization of Latin@ literature present challenges to U.S. canon formation?

The course readings will consist of a combination of popular articles, speeches, poetry, fiction, and scholarly works. The readings are meant to guide students through a foundation of theory and research into areas of practice, and also raise issues regarding the “canon” and the “counter-canon.” Assignments include a short written analysis of a text (5 pages) and a longer, research project (8-10 pages) which can take the form of a research paper, teaching plan, or multimedia video. Student will also keep a service-learning journal from our interactions with local community organizations.The interactive format (lecture, small group discussion, in-class writing) of this course will also require students active participation. 

LAT 001: Elementary Latin (4 credits)
Fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Emphasis on language structure and vocabulary building.

LAT 011: Intermediate Latin (4 credits)
Readings in Latin prose or poetry. Consolidation of reading ability; introduction to literary analysis. Students should have completed two semesters of elementary Latin or the equivalent.

ASIA/HIST/MLL 096: Understanding Hong Kong (4 credit)
This course introduces Hong Kong, from its history as a vibrant British colony to its current status as a bustling territory mediating between China and the world. The learning objectives and outcomes consist not only of a knowledge of Hong Kong's significance for global commerce and culture but also of the ability to analyze primary and secondary sources as well as to conduct independent research. Course materials, which include wartime stories and autobiographical novellas, romantic comedies and martial arts films, are all available in English.

PHIL 004: Belief, Knowledge, Action (4 credits)
Through reading selected texts in philosophy, from the ancient period to the modern Enlightenment and Romantic reaction, we shall introduce ourselves to some of the central epistemological, ontological, ethical, and socio-political positions developed in relation to their historical and material contexts. A unifying theme thus will be the emergence and evolution of rational thought and its relation to belief, knowledge, and action. Course not open to seniors.

PHIL 006: Conduct and Character (4 credits)
How should we live our lives? How should we act? What kinds of persons should we be? What should we care about? These are among the central questions of philosophy because they are among the most central questions of human existence. This explores answers that have been proposed by thinkers throughout history and across cultures. Course not open to seniors.

PHIL 014: Reasoning & Critical Thinking (4 credits)
Most intellectual endeavors involve reasoning.  Whether in everyday discussion about right and wrong, friendly political disagreements, ordinary explanations of natural phenomena, and short letters to editors, or in sophisticated legal debates, national political campaigns, complex treatises, and intricate scientific theories, reasons are constantly invoked to support or criticize points of view.  This course develops skills needed to reason well, to analyze and critique others’ reasoning, to distinguish reasoning from mere rhetoric, and to become a savvy consumer of information.

REL 079: Religion & Fantasy Lit (4 credits)
A survey of the religious themes that entered fantasy literature in the 1950s in the works of C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien, and the humanist resistance to those themes in works by J. K. Rowling, Philip Pullman, or others.

ASIA/GS/REL 095: Muslim Asia: Rel, Culture, Pol (4 credits)
Despite an overwhelming focus on Islam in the Middle East, most Muslims in the World now live in South and Southeast Asia.  In this course, we will explore the ongoing evolutionn of these societies as the deal with the novel opportunities and challenges of globalization in the 21st century.  We will also investigate how modern Muslim identities emerge from a complex interplay between religion, culture, and politics.

REL 096: Bible in Contemp Film & Media (4 credit)
The Bible appears in many contemporary contexts well outside standard religious contexts, film, literature, and politics being the most common.  In this course, students will examine how the Bible is used (and abused) in the contemporary world (both in religious and secular contexts), focusing particularly on how the Bible is interpreted in modernity and how looking at the Bible's ancient historical and cultural contexts illuminate these interpretations.

REL 098: What Is Religion? (4 credit)
The word "religion" is fairly recent in origin, its linguistic roots unclear, and the phenomena that it has been used to designate both vast and amorphous.  This course explores some of the most prominent attempts to define "religion," definitions produced both by religious thinkers and by critics of religion.  We will examine some of the methods used by scholars to study religion.  Finally, we will ask how the meaning of the word may be shifting in a modern, secular age.

RUSS 001: Elementary Russian I (4 credits)
Classroom and laboratory, audio, and video introduction to the fundamentals of conversational and grammatical patterns; practice in pronunciation, simple conversation, reading, and writing.

RUSS 011: Intermediate Russian I (4 credits)
Classroom and laboratory practice in conversation. Development of reading and writing skills.

SPAN 001: Elementary Spanish I (4 credits)
Basic conversational Spanish illustrating essential grammatical principles. Reading of simple texts and writing.

SPAN 011: Intermediate Spanish I (4 credits)
Limited review of elementary grammar concepts and introduction to more advanced grammar and vocabulary. Emphasis on discussion, reading, and writing about short literary works and current topics in the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 012: Intermediate Spanish II (4 credits)
Continuation of SPAN 011.

THTR 011: Introduction To Acting (4 credits)
Preparation for scene study and characterization.

THTR 020: Stagecraft I (2 credits)
Introduction to the art of scenic construction and technical theatre. Scenic construction materials, techniques, tools, rigging and safety. Practical experience in executing scenery for the stage.

THTR 022: Stage Props & Decoration (2 credits)
Creating props and decor for the stage. Production assignment as assistant property master.

THTR 023: Basic Scene Painting (2 credits)
Painting for the stage. Production assignments painting with scenic artist.

THTR 025: Costume Construction I (2 credits)
Introduction to the art of costume construction. Costume construction materials, techniques, tools and safety. Practical experience in executing costumes for the stage.

THTR 027: Lighting Tech & Prod I (2 credits)
Introduction to the art of lighting technology and production. Lighting techniques, tools and safety. Practical experience in executing lighting for the stage.

THTR 030: Sound Tech & Production I (2 credits)
Introduction to the art and technology of sound reinforcement. Audio theory, methods and practice. Practical experience in executing audio technical support for the stage.

CLSS/ENGL/THTR 054: Greek Tragedy (4 credits)
Aspects of Greek theater and plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in their social and intellectual contexts.

AAS/THTR 059: West African Dance (2 credits)
This course will explore the dance movement and rhythms of West Africa. Students will learn African-based dance technique, characteristics, and the fundamental connection between the drums and the dance. Although some videos will be viewed, this is primarily a studio course; students should come prepared to move.

ENGL/THTR 060: Dramatic Action (4 credits)
How plays are put together; how they work and what they accomplish. Examination of how plot, character, aural and visual elements of production combine to form a unified work across genre, styles and periods. Recommended as a foundation for further studies in design, literature, or performance.

AAS/THTR 066: Hip Hop Dance (2 credits)
Techniques, vocabulary, and history behind the various elements of the Hip Hop Movement. Focus upon the cultural influence of Hip Hop dance styles, and the overall social influence of the Hip Hop Movement.

AAS/THTR 066: Hip Hop Dance (2 credits)
Techniques, vocabulary, and history behind the various elements of the Hip Hop Movement. Focus upon the cultural influence of Hip Hop dance styles, and the overall social influence of the Hip Hop Movement.

THTR 067: BackStage Crew (2 credits)
Production run crew assignment.

DES/THTR 087: Performance Design (4 credits)
Introduction to the process of creating integrated designs in theatre production. The study and practice of the principles of visual representation, historical and conceptual research and the study of theatrical styles.

THTR 095: Indian Classical Dance (2 credit)
Introduction to the history and practice of Bharatanatyam, a classical dance style of India.  Understanding basic footwork, hand gestures, and body movements, and how they are combined to convey emotion, meaning, and imagery.  Traditional repertoire, music, terminology, and the spectator’s experience of the dance.  Additional Course Fee:  $270.00.

ENGL/WGSS 097: Rewriting Romance (4 credit)
This course will pair classic literary romances with contemporary romantic comedies to examine the tropes that transcend form and time. These pairings will allow the class to investigate the ways in which cultural beliefs about gender, class, race, religion, age, and sexuality inflect our perceptions of romance. Romantic comedies as a genre either reinforce exclusionary notions of “normal” romance, or offer plots constructed around specific challenges to love based in cultural difference; together, we will look at the roots of this trend in literature through the lens of a few enduring themes.